Are transfer students more successful?

On balance, campus administrators, regardless of sector, believe transfer students perform well. Officials at two- and four-year colleges alike say that roughly three-quarters of students who transfer into an institution perform at least as well as students who began their academic careers at that institution.

Do transfer students have a better chance?

The acceptance rate for transfer students is generally lower than it is for freshman. That doesn’t mean you shouldn’t be a transfer student or that it’s a bad choice—it means you need to plan ahead and follow through, just as you would if you were a high school student applying to a four-year school.

Are transfer students more likely to graduate?

A descriptive study from the National Student Clearinghouse found that students who transferred with a certificate or two-year degree were 16 percentage points more likely to earn a bachelor’s degree than students who transferred without one (72 percent vs. 56 percent).

Is it hard being a transfer student?

There is a particular struggle to being a transfer student in college. Whether you start at a local community college, a sister school to your dream university, or some art school you decide you hate after a semester, transferring to a new school is emotionally and mentally challenging.

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What percent of transfer students are accepted?

According to a report from the National Association for College Admission Counseling, the average rate of admission for a transfer applicant is 62 percent. Comparatively, first-time freshman applicants are admitted at a rate of 66 percent.

Is a 3.7 GPA good in community college?

Is a 3.7 GPA “good” in college? On an unweighted GPA scale, a 3.7 GPA means you obtained mostly A’s. … Students taking mostly high-level classes will fare well with a 3.7 GPA. Students with an average course load still look good, but it’s more expected with the less intense classes.

Does transferring colleges look bad?

Transferring college isn’t reflected as bad at all, especially if you transfer to a better college. Obama transferred from Occidental College to Columbia. Most transfer admissions is harder than freshmen admissions with the exception of a few. Most public schools (UC, UVA, W&M, UMich, UNC, etc.)

Is it bad to go to community college then transfer?

Community colleges offer significantly lower tuition, smaller classes and strong student support. … In fact, many university advisors recommend that students attend community college “college transfer” programs first, and then transfer to universities for the final two years.

Is it hard to transfer from a community college to a university?

Transferring CAN Be Easy

Fortunately for you, the transferring process from a community college to a university can be quite easy as long as you make a plan and are willing to put in the work and effort required to make it happen.

Is community college easier than university?

It’s a popular myth that community college classes are “easier” than classes at four-year universities. I for one can testify that this is untrue. Class difficulty depends on the professors and how much work you are willing to put into them—not the type of college you are attending.

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Are transfer students happy?

Transfer students go through a lot of transitions in a short span of time, but those 37%–39% of students who transfer do so willingly, knowing it will make them happier in the long run.

What are the pros and cons of transferring colleges?

The Pros and Cons of Transferring

  • Pro: Going to a college that fits you better. …
  • Con: Credits that might be lost or not transfer at all. …
  • Pro: Studying at your first-choice college. …
  • Con: Leaving behind people and places. …
  • Pro: Saving money. …
  • Con: Being the “new kid” again. …
  • Pro: Personal growth. …
  • Con: Culture shock.

What is the point of a transfer student?

In general, a transfer student is one who begins their college academic career at one institution, earns some credits through completion of coursework, and then decides for whatever reason to transfer to a different school to finish their education.